The Artist and The Yogi

An Artist With a Third Eye

An Artist With a Third Eye

The Artist

and the Yogi

are of the same mind.

deep inside,

they both find

spirals

of

unthoughts

that later

become

thoughts

or breaths.

The Artist’s

mind moves

his hand to paint

what his inner eye

sees/saw.

The Yogi’s

mind moves

her essence to become

who she is

at one

at once

at all

there is no

description

prescription

for entering

sacred space

you know it

when you find

its place.

Artist and

Yogi

at one

at once

at all

She knew This place

She knew The place, photo by Ansel Adams

 

Actually the poem sort of poured out of my morning meditation – the book, The Unknown Ansel Adams,(1982) came later. Adams was not a painting artist, but a meticulous photographer who changed how we view the world – particularly, the wilderness and canyons of our National Parks. There are many books on Ansel Adams, including camera technique books -but this slim softcover features some of his lesser-known, ( I believe) highly spiritual works.

 

SOLD ON eBay

Harry Potter Commemoratives - from 2007

Harry Potter Commemorative stamps – from 2007, Mint

I confess

I’ve not read

Harry Potter

books,

but I really

ought-er,

since I just

sold his

commem stamps

on eBay.

Way!,

you might say

or, I suppose -

Boy, did you

just get

hosed!

And I did.

They bid

what I asked

(which, by the way,

is always too

low)

& hammer hammer

(in the virtual world)

Sold!

On eBay,

you can

peep

some

pretty good

stuff,

if you look

close enuff.

Or, you can

sell for too

cheap,

and then

lose sleep.

Guess which

category

I fall

in to?

You would

not be impert,

if you said -

Seller, beware

you’re losing

your shirt. 

Harry Potter Commemorative stamps not meant to be sent

Harry Potter Commemorative stamps not meant to be sent

 

As a book collector/dealer/writer, I sell my books and writing on different sites. I’ve sold books & ephemera high at some pricey auctions and also at eBay and other stores on the internet. But, on eBay,  some times, I often over-estimate what the buyer will bid  and under-estimate the price I am asking. This time, the Potter stamps worked out pretty well for both me and my buyer. But that’s not always the case!

 

 

Babar and Father Christmas

 

Babar - a Christmas Story

Babar was a Daddy-O

I wish I had

a Father Christmas.

Amend that.

I wish I had a

Father.

So many ppls

take their fathers

for granted.

But having a

Father in

your life,

espec during

the holidays,

beats being lonely

for a whiff of Old Spice

and a nice game of

Scrabble with

Dear Old Dad.

Having a Daddy-O

is cooler than cool -

cuz good Dads are

great, but great Dads

rule.

This Season,

why don’t ya

tell your

Pops

he’s tops;

that his love is

better than

any present

under the tree.

Even better than

one of those square

blue

boxes from

Tiffany.

Take it from me.

 

Babar is a French children’s character, who first appeared in 1931. He was the lead character in a story book written by Jean du Brunhoff. Over the years, Babar, like the children who read about him, married and became a father. That didn’t slow him down. Babar’s books are popular world-wide, especially in Japan.  Over the past 83 years, the Babar books have done a lot to brighten children’s lives and also, hopefully, to help save the Elephants so charmingly illustrated. My copy,shown above, is Babar and Father Christmas, translated from the French (hardcover, a later vintage printing from Random House).

 

 

 

A Voice in the Night

Not the kind of voice I was imagining  --

Not the kind of voice I was imagining –

Have you heard

that voice

at night

the one that

causes all

the fright?

Listen here,

I have a plan -

to muff that noise,

turn on the fan.

wearing ear plugs

also helps

snuff out shrieks,

and

smother yelps.

Music is another

means

to send that creepy

voice to Queens.

Radio masks

groans and

growls,

stifles shouts

of mostly vowels.

If that doesn’t work,

and all else fails

turn the dial

to Nine Inch Nails.

 

 A Voice in the Night and Other Stories by Frederick Hall is from 1911. This is one of those books I bought just for its cover. Many beautiful book covers were crafted during the Art Nouveau era -circa 1900-1915 –  often designed with flowing patterns and titled in gilt. I have no idea what the stories are like, but I have a clue, since it was published by The Sunday School Times.

 

Star Wars, 1977

The Classic 1977 George Lucas film-book

The Classic 1977 George Lucas film-book

Been thinkin’

’bout me

& how I

need my

own

Ben

(Obi Wan)

Kenobi.

I could

use his

special

powers

to help

glide me

through the

sleepless

hours

that

drag-on,

and on

in dense etheric

haze.

Am I at

war?

Am I

an

under-armed

soldier

battling

unseen

creatures

from

an outer

realm?

If so,

Obi, take

the helm.

I yam too

teary-weary

to keep

fighting.

I must

add

a layer

of distraction,

Like prayer,

to complete

my extraction -

if ya know

what I mean.

Obi, if you’re there,

take the

helm.

Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca, See-Threepio & Artoo-Detoo

Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca, See-Threepio & Artoo-Detoo

Star Wars, 1977, shook us all up movie-wise. It was a seminal moment in light sci-fi film & special affects history – perhaps most of all for George Lucas. Above is a Twentieth Century Fox 1977 softcover book promotion for the film. It lists cast & crew, adds some behind-the-scenes photos and just the barest synopsis. Nice collectible! There’s a lot of buzz already about the 2015 version. We’ll see just how far it moves us this time.

 

 

FORTUNE MAGAZINE – JANUARY, 1934

A magazine for the Fortunate, 9 1934

A magazine for the Fortunate – January, 1934

 

Look here

and do not fear,

you won’t see

any Signs

of the Great

Depression;

No ppls standing

in line

for bread.

Instead

read about Modern

Art, Hershey’s

good heart &

the New York Stock

Exchange.

Peruse the advertise-ments

for Cruises & Cars,

then

belly up to the

bars, boys,

& drink to that!

The fact

some ppls weren’t

affected

by The Great Depression’s

woes.

They still

rolled in

dough,

unlike the dough

that went to

bake the bread

that fed

those who had

no work.

Jerks not,

but still

breathing

rare air.

Ain’t that

the way it

always is?

Some give up

all,

& some keeps

his.

 

Cruises & Cars

Cruises & Cars

Reading this copy of Fortune, you’d think The Great Depression was a Grimm’s Fairy Tale –  there is very little evidence of the Wolf at the Door in this January, 1934 issue. People were crusing you know, or trading stocks, or enjoying Modern art in Fortune’s world. Only Carl Sandburg was brave enough to suggest (subtly) that greed trumped people in need. He didn’t come right out & say it, but he titled his long poem, in this issue, “Moonlight and Maggots.” Yeah.

 

 

 

The Compleat Astrologer, 1971

 

from The Age of Aquarius, 1971

from The Era of The Age of Aquarius, 1971

What’s your Sign?

You may decline

to answer

on the grounds

it could intimidate

you.

I’ve never been

afraid to say

I’m an Aries -

although my

answer varies,

depending on

who wants to know.

It’s not just the

Zodiac -

it’s the Archetypes

of the 12 Signs

that define us.

They’re as real

as the Milky Way.

I’m not the only

one

who thinks so.

Jung

was a follower

of sorts.

He

left nothing to

chance;

yin/yang,

I Ching

Freud (avoid,

avoid)

He also knew a thing

or two or three

about Astrology.

So he

some times

used

the Zodiac

to help

him

analyze.

How wise

to think outside

the box.

I use it,

too.

That’s

a

skill

I once

was paid

for :

Cast ye

nets or

‘scopes

into the water;

hope

luck & love

will bless your

heart.

And, you’ll know

that when it does,

it was

be-cuz -

it showed up

in your

chart.

 

Also known as Moon Child

Also known as Moon Child

 

For a brief time, I was a psychic astrologer. I invented the title – but it worked out pretty good. I taught myself how to interpret the Zodiac Signs (without all the maths) by consulting numerous vintage books on the subject. The Compleat Astrologer was one of them, but the copy I had was a softcover, falling apart; not a beauty like this hardcover, “compleat” in its own slip case. This is a first edition from 1971, by Derek & Julia Parker. Published by McGraw Hill. Very “Hair”, if you know what I mean.

 

Photo Technique, July, 1940

 

Definitely Not Digital

Definitely Not Digital

Never thought I’d see

the day when phones took photos.

Kodak, R.I.P.

Kodachrome portrait for Harper's Bazaar by the great Louise Dahl-Wolfe

Kodachrome portrait for Harper’s Bazaar by the great Louise Dahl-Wolfe

 

short little Haiku homage to my love for vintage cameras. I found this July, 1940 issue of Photo Technique at the estate-sale of an uber-collector of cameras, photo magazines, books & ephemera. I bought his vintage Bolex 8m movie camera, complete in an English leather case. I won’t use it. I’ll just look at it. Beauty in a box. There was no evidence of digital cameras or photography at this sale, but there were a lot of Kodak cameras (and Rollei, Leica, Zeiss, Minolta, Nikon, Polaroid)etc.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1938

The book that shook the world

The book that shook
the world

Because she abhored

Slavery, Harriet

Beecher Stowe

wrote a book

that

lit the match

that hatched

the Civil War

(as

Lincoln

said).

Maybe he

was dead

wrong

about the dreadful

War’s

cause.

But her Uncle Tom’s

Cabin did

give the whole world

pause

to consider

the plight of

America’s

slaves.

Yes, she

hated slavery,

but she wrote

the serial story

for money;

to help support

her family;

to make ends meet.

No bodies say

much about Harriet

Beecher Stowe’s

motivation for

writing the book

that shook

the world -

her

show

of

courage &

fortitude.

True,

she wrote,

from passion

and from heart,

but

she also wrote,

in part,

because she had

to.

Ah, inspire-r

of women writers

every where. She

wrote,

because she

had to.

 

The 1938 version of Uncle Tom's Cabin from Heritage Press.

The 1938 version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin from Heritage Press.

This is the 1938 Heritage Press publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Illustrated by the amazing Mexican artist, Miguel Covarrubias, this 294-page hardcover (in slipcase) pays homage to the great classic, anti-slavery writing of Harriet Beecher Stowe. The alternate name of her book is “Life Among the Lowly” – and it was serialized, with both titles, in 1951. It appeared then in an abolitionist newspaper, ending in April 1952. Nine years later, the Civil War erupted. This gorgeous hardcover book, above, is almost as gorgeous as the story it contains – both book & story still relevant, don’t you think?

 

 

 

Generation of Vipers

1942's dystopian rant

1942’s classic non-fiction rant

 

(after the great dystopian, Philip Wylie)

 

We are bleak

We are weak

with bleakness

we are unwell

suffering from

the days of hell

when

the vipers bit.

not once, not twice

not thrice

but

2001

times, when

all was smoke

and acrid smell,

flashes of

ashes, raining

down

from the

fire

storms lit

by man’s

hands, storms

we did not

suspect -

they were

not storms from

the

forces of nature

we know

to expect

&

how could

it be

a man-made

volcano

would blot

the sun,

turning the sky

to

black to bleak

to bleak to blue,

blue still

so weak it has no

hue.

I tell you,

this can’t

stand.

enough.

mebbe a rant

in unison -

a million voices

raised in chant

this is not what we

believe

is what we need

I see it starting

now

little tiny pieces

forming

joining

gathering

in

a line – lines

become

an etching

an etching

becomes

a work of art.

it is time

past due

for mind

and heart

to speak out

to chant,

in rant,

this is not

what we

believe

 

These are the days when interested people (mainly dystopians) discover (or re-discover) Philip Wylie’s Generation of Vipers. Published in 1942, during the War, Wylie unleashed his vitriol on almost every topic you can think of (at least circa 1940s), including women who wore too much makeup, men who profited from making war, and even dear-old Mom (the term “momism” refers to Wylie’s writings). His book caused so much back-lash and ranting from its readers, Wylie’s life became miserable. He said later, he wished he’d never written the book. Here it is, in first edition – war-time issue – from Farrar & Rhinehart, a First edition (war-time)