Bookmarks, The Pause

  ye olde BookMark (found in ye olde book)

ye olde BookMark
(found in ye olde book)

Bookmarks the pause when

reality creeps up like

little cat feet claws

 

Never to be found in an eBook

Never to be found in an eBook

 

Above, one of the many bookmarks I’ve found in the books I collect – some of them are grand – made of leather or embroidered silk; some are little slips of torn paper – but they do their job, just as well. If you collect books, you’re just as likely to collect the bookmarks and other ephemera you find. To my mind, little treasures from the past.

Escape From Alcatraz, 1963

A Farewell to the Rock, 1963

A Farewell to the Rock, 1963

This book’s about

a prison — Alcatraz,

said to be

inescapable.

But some one(s)

did – or so they

claim -

to win some fame

for swimming

with the sharks

& making it to land.

But listen up -

that prison sat

on a rock

atop

an island in the

middle of the Bay

but I say,

we don’t need no rock

to be locked up -

we all prisoners

one way

or another.

our minds keep us

behind unseen

bars that

block the stars

& shut out hope.

we wait

we wait

we wait for parole -

gotta stay whole

in the mean time.

I feel I  served

enough,

but I still hear the

door slam behind

me , and I

hit the floor,

waiting for the ceiling

to open up

and pull me free.

how long ’til it

be

that

I’m not a prisoner

no more

& can

Escape to

reality

P1020874

 

This is a first-edition hardcover by J. Campbell Bruce, who also signed the book. It was owned, previously, by a former Parole officer at Alcatraz. If those walls/cells could talk! If you don’t want to read this 248-page book (there are no photos), you can always see the film adaptation, with Clint Eastwood.

Book Sale Day, Jack Kerouac Find

King of the Beats

King of the Beats

Today – A

Half-Price-

Book-Sale.

I

Never Fail

to Find a Book

I can’t Live

Without

A Sucha Sale.

Today, I

Found a Jewel -

Give a Shout-

Out

to Handsome

Jack Kerouac

& His Love-Story,

The Subterraneans.

I all-ways drool

at the thought

of finding a Kerouac

book some body

over-looked.

No Chance of that,

cuz Jack is fat

with die-hard fans

searchin’ for his works.

But today,

I hit pay dirt.

hidden back

in the stacks,

a Kerouac!

I now own a Bit

of the Lit

legacy

of the King of the Beats.

lucky me!

 

I found the first edition paperback of Jack Kerouac’s The Subterraneans, an Avon Book, published in 1959 (following The Grove Press First Edition of 1958). This small paperback was $.35 originally – a steal then.  Henry Miller, in the book’s Preface, wrote ” Jack Kerouac has done something to our immaculate prose from which it may never recover.”  Indeed.

 

The New Celebrity Cookbook by Shirley MacLaine, 1973

Recipes Collected by Shirley MacLaine

Recipes Collected by Shirley MacLaine

Celebs can cook!

On, yes, they can!

I know because I

saw it in a book.

Not just any stars,

but old-timers you

can see

on AMC.

Some,  like

Lauren Bacall

&

Bette Davis,

aren’t here

no more, but

though

gone,

their Watercress Soup

&

Red Flannel Hash

live on.

Wouldn’t you

kinda like

to bake

Lucille Ball’s

Persimmon Cake?

or toss some noodles

in Frank Sinatra’s

spaghetti

sauce?

I know

I would

Mmm, Famous People

good!

P1020787

Here’s a fun 95-page vintage (1973) cookbook, The New Celebrity Cookbook, compiled by Shirley MacLaine! Proceeds from the book’s sale benefitted Women For! (It was the ’70s, after all). And, movie stars, fashion designers (Edith Head), singers, musicians and even authors contributed their favorite recipes – or their favorite recipes as suggested by their personal assistants. This book contains not only recipes, but the printed signatures (autographs) of the Celebrated, which some people today might like to consult to compare to the autographs they buy on-line.

 

 

 

Cookin’ In The Twenties – Somebody Had To Make Dinner

Three cookbooks from the 1920s

Three cookbooks from the 1920s

Flappers aside,

somebody had to make

dinner!

After all,

how fat could you

be,

pourin gin in

your tea?

I imagine then,

it

was Granny

in the kitchen,

mincin meat for

pie

watchin bread

get high.

takin care of

cookin -

stretchin

pennies into dimes.

It was Depression times

so cookbooks,

more often than not,

taught how to be frugal

makin a kugel

and

how to save money

skippin the honey –

These good, ol’

’20s cookbooks

had somethin

for every body -

even

Art Deco color

pictures that

made your

mouth water.

Everybody thankful

water was free.

Mixin it up in the 1920s kitchen

Mixin it up in the 1920s kitchen                        

 

Three 1920s cookbooks from my vintage cookbook collection – not in the best shape, but think of what they’ve been through – including The Great Depression. These are all brand-name-cookbooks: Procter & Gamble, Good Housekeeping and Wear-Ever aluminum. Imagine! Aluminum cookware was new back then – emerging from the cast-iron ages. Some collectors like cookbooks published before the birth of the big appliance industry. These books are from the days when cooking was more of hands-on, hand-made arts & craft endeavor. Don’t think our Grandma ever thought of it that way.

Webster’s National Dictionary, 1963

Define Dictionary

Define Dictionary

Well, what can you

say

about a dictionary?

As a matter of fact,

what can’t you say

about a book that

defines

the meaning

of every word

you can think of

and some

you missed?

I ask -

who did all

this word work

way back when -

and, then,

without Google?

Noah Webster

must have had

some kind of  fine

mind to find this

task even

remotely possible.

And, also,  a lot of time

on his hands.

pen stroke

pen stroke

pen stroke

I bet by the time

he got to zymurgy,

he was ready for

bed

or at least a grog

(in no particular order).

 

 

Here’s a copy of the rather handsome 1963 edition of Webster’s National Dictionary. And here’s the back-story. It was published by Leslie Schwartz Associates in New York. Now, defining the word “quadrat” might be easier than finding any reference to the publisher, Leslie Schwartz Associates. I think it’s really interesting that this publisher came out of nowhere – and then went back.

Aloha Ukulele, 1941

 

Aloha: Until We Meet Again

Aloha: Until We Meet Again, 1941

Aloha Ukulele,

not a book,

but a menu.

Like a book,

Cover, content,

pages -

(four in fact,

and all intact).

The best books

(and menus),

stir your dreams,

kindle hope,

take you on a

trip

to other lands

and seas,

with many

possibilities.

Live large.

Take a Steamer,

not a barge.

Surrender to the

powers of

color and

fragrance -

sip the consomme,

dip the sautéed frog legs

in their

sauce,

dance a Hula,

then fox trot.

You are all

you’ve got.

The Fancy cakes

await you

Demi Tasse

Demi Tasse

 

This is a S.S. Lurline cruise ship menu from Tuesday, May 13, 1941. The cover was painted by famed Hawaiian artist, Frank Macintosh – the title is “Aloha Ukulele.” A menu like this, with its iconic Streamlined Moderne Hawaiian art, stirs up vintage memories of travel, as it was, just before WWII. Dreamy, relatively uncomplicated, and “ideal” in the way we think of it now.

 

 

 

I Loved Lucy

The Greatest Star

The Greatest Star

The Stars

came out

tonight

to congratulate

& air kiss

one another

at the Emmy show.

I like TV

all right,

but it

was better

back then,

when I Love

Lucy

was on at night.

I Love Lucy still.

My favorite show ever -

so funny then and now -

no

(TV) fake laugh -

track,    never.

I just wish

Lucy was around

to clown

some more -

to grow old

with us

to show us

how to age

ungracefully -

Oh, Lucy,

You were the

Greatest Star !

What you

could have done

with a bottle of

prune juice

& a bag

of Depends!

You may

be gone, girl,

but your

gags don’t

end.

I loved Lucy once.

I love her still.

 

 

 

What a find! “The I Love Lucy Book” by Bart Andrews. A 423-page softcover book contains summaries of all the episodes of the original I Love Lucy show – plus complete cast listings, ratings and original air dates. There are hundreds of b/w photos, interviews, and behind-the-scenes tales. Published in 1985 by Doubleday (A Dolphin Book).

 

 

 

Baby, You Can Drive My MotorCar

Need I Say More?

Need I Say More?

I go far

in a car

like this.

Of course,

I never

take the wheel -

the chauffeur

drives me

& I arrive

in style,

at any given

social

event,

held under

the stars, in

a pitched tent,

on the green,

by a  private

Lake.

I need not go

far

in my motorcar

to make

a statement.

I am so very rich,

I can be a

bitch

if and when I choose -

my Rolls

speaks for me,

louder

than my voice,

by choice.

     Inside My Ride

Inside My Ride

 

The Encyclopedia of the Motorcar: 400 pages of photos and details about fine, fine cars, – including “100 great cars” (circa 1970s). This 1979 history & reference book  is for classic-car-collectors – a growing genre in the collecting-for investment field.  Also includes the  history of the car racing.

 

 

In Another Life, an Indian

the story of an Indian baby and his early childhood

the story of an Indian baby and his early childhood, 1930

In another life,

I was

Indian -

I am told

this

by my Guide.

He doesn’t have

to say it,

I feel it

inside.

The whistle

of the wind,

the trill

of the thrush,

familiar to me -

still

touches

my heart

in a way I

can’t

explain.

I am old

dirt

dust

clay

the sun

bleaches me

dry like

a cow skull

at Abiquiu.

I am

at peace

 

Not easily erased

Not easily erased

 

Inspired by Little Eagle, A Story of Indian Life, by Therese O. Deming, Illustrated by Edward Deming., Laidlaw, 1930. 96 pages. A perfect little book, disfigured by a rowdy child set loose with a green and purple crayon. All is not lost.